Slow Learners

Maybe we all knew someone in school who didn’t say much, but had a lot of things going on in their head. Whatever was going in in the kid’s mind and brain made him a fast learner that he actually out paced his school peers. But as smart as he was, he had one short coming. He did not like to take the time to calculate mathematical problems. Therefore the Teachers labeled him slow and was thrown into what is called the “dunce” class; the so called slow learners.

Even in that class, the so called dunce kids were much better then him in math; but when it came to everything else he excelled. English, social studies, history, etc was a breeze and he got the highest marks. On every exam it was either 90% or 100%; far above everyone else.

But something like this isn’t unusual. The famed Author Voltaire had a similar problem. This guy was an absolute genius in everything. But when his Teachers thought that Voltaire’s abilities would cross over in mathematics; they got a rude awaken to discover that even a genius have limitations. When it came to mathematics he was just as slow as the average student.

Even another well know genius had trouble with mathematics during his formative years as a young student. This genius eventually got it together and became a major scientist that developed many theories based on complex mathematical calculations. That person was Albert Einstein.

Even with Voltaire & Einstein’s short comings of being slow when it came to mathematics, it is doubtful that their Teachers gave up on them. But in contemporary society, many Teachers would not have paid them any mind and they may not get the attention they need.  

What is the moral of this story? Well I’ll let you ponder it, and then maybe you can enlighten me.    

4 Comments »

  1. Everyone at their own pace // Slow and steady wins the race // Still waters run deep?

    Great response to the prompt. As a teacher, I’m surprised at myself for not thinking of it!

    Like

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